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    Forward | Udi Edelman and Yael Messer / Ma'arav

    Issue No. 19 of Ma’arav engages with the artist Ezra Orion and is published simultaneously with the “Launch Sites” exhibition that presents the artist’s main works as well as special material from his private archive.

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Forward | Udi Edelman and Yael Messer - Ma'arav

Issue No. 19 of Ma’arav engages with the artist Ezra Orion and is published simultaneously with the “Launch Sites” exhibition that presents the artist’s main works as well as special material from his private archive.

Ezra Orion – Stone, Light, and Energy Builder | Yigal Zalmona - Ma'arav

“To generate a high-intensity spiritual experience sculpture must be big” Orion talked about his Sculpture Field in terms of light breaking into high masses of darkness.

Avraham Hay | Ezra Orion at Work - Ma'arav

Orion worked in close collaboration with photographer Avraham Hay who photographed Orion’s sculptures and actions, starting at Sde Boker and as far away as Annapurna in Nepal. In this series we are exposed to the less official photographs taken by Hay over the years, which document different stages of Orion’s creation and provide a glimpse of the artists’ work process, and not necessarily the finished outcome.

Astro-Chasms: A photographic perspective of what’s been done between Mars and the Negev | Rotem Rozental - Ma'arav

In the “Sculpture in the Solar System” category in his website, Ezra Orion, apparently the first and the only intergalactic Zionist sculptor who worked at Sde Boker – up to the time of writing – outlines a plan for a sculptural projection on Mars.

Naama Hadany | Glal, 2016 - Ma'arav

Hadany created the image “Glal” especially for the digital format of this issue.

Orion

featuredimage Ezra Orion – Stone, Light, and Energy Builder | Yigal Zalmona

“To generate a high-intensity spiritual experience sculpture must be big” Orion talked about his Sculpture Field in terms of light breaking into high masses of darkness.

featuredimage Avraham Hay | Ezra Orion at Work

Orion worked in close collaboration with photographer Avraham Hay who photographed Orion’s sculptures and actions, starting at Sde Boker and as far away as Annapurna in Nepal. In this series we are exposed to the less official photographs taken by Hay over the years, which document different stages of Orion’s creation and provide a glimpse of the artists’ work process, and not necessarily the finished outcome.

featuredimage Astro-Chasms: A photographic perspective of what’s been done between Mars and the Negev | Rotem Rozental

In the “Sculpture in the Solar System” category in his website, Ezra Orion, apparently the first and the only intergalactic Zionist sculptor who worked at Sde Boker – up to the time of writing – outlines a plan for a sculptural projection on Mars.

featuredimage Naama Hadany | Glal, 2016

Hadany created the image “Glal” especially for the digital format of this issue.

featuredimage The Boundaries of Contiguity between the Moist and the Arid | Ofri Ilany

Every day at dusk, Ezra Orion would appear beyond the fence surrounding Midreshet Ben-Gurion on the trail to Sde Zin, where the route of his daily run passed. Sometimes one of the boys would mutter: “What a man!” In the regularity of his appearance he was like a natural element, like a geological formation, like Hod Akev itself.

featuredimage Reaching for the Heavens, Pulled back to Earth / Noah Simblist

I first met Ezra Orion in the summer of 1990. It was about an hour before dawn at the Har ha-Negev field school, just outside of Mitzpeh Ramon. I was a part of a group of American and Israeli teenagers on a seven-week summer program and we milled about the cafeteria drinking tea and coffee to wake us up and keep us warm. While it was summer, the desert air was cool. We slowly filed into busses that pulled out into an inky expanse that I soon realized was Makhtesh Ramon, a 40 kilometer wide crater.

featuredimage Vertical Element / Noa Giniger

Following the invitation to contribute to the issue of Maarav dedicated to Ezra Orion, artist Noa Giniger created Vertical Element, a website that enables infinite scrolling down (or perhaps up) the slopes of the virtual world.

featuredimage Into the Wild: The American Desert and the Lie of Land Art / Meital Raz

Instead of using a paintbrush to make his art, Robert Morris would like to use a bulldozer[1] (Robert Smithson)

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